Spotlight on Parks: Jackson Lake State Park

American White Pelican soaring over Jackson reservoir. Photo by Jamie Simo.

Jackson Reservoir, for which Jackson Lake State Park was named, was created over 100 years ago in 1901 and 1902 to serve as a place to store water for irrigation. The lake sits in the middle of farm country out on the plains. It wasn’t until 1965 that Jackson Lake was designated a Colorado State Park. Now, in addition to providing a thirsty area with water, it serves as a draw for boaters, waterskiers, swimmers, and birders. The lake is regularly stocked for fishermen with species such as rainbow trout, large and small-mouth bass, and walleye.

Jackson Lake comes alive in the spring. In addition to the aforementioned human users, the park is an oasis for shorebirds and waterfowl as well as a draw for songbirds. My last trip, though early in the season, was filled with birdsong. I primarily saw and heard American Robins, but the highlight was the mass of Cedar Waxwings giving off their shrill whistles among the Russian olive. Impossible to glimpse, but with their outsize voices on full display, western chorus frogs were also trilling in low-lying swampy areas beside the beach.

A flock of Cedar Waxwings at Jackson Lake State Park. Photo by Jamie Simo.

Jackson Lake boasts 260 campsites and 3,303 acres for recreation. In addition to watersports, there is an off-road vehicle track for dirt bikes and atvs, a volleyball court, and several trails for hiking. The park even maintains a couple of geocaches.

Admission to the park is $7 a day or $70 for an annual parks pass that admits you to all Colorado State Parks for the year. Senior Aspen Leaf annual passes are $60 if you are 64 or over. Information on camping costs and facility or vehicle rental (jet skis, boats) fees are available on the park website.

When I went, the park wasn’t very busy, but I suspect now that the weather is warm and school is nearly out, that’ll change so you may want to visit sooner rather than later!