Tag Archives: identification

ID Challenge: Mountain vs Black-capped vs Carolina Chickadee

Mountain Chickadee. Photo by Jamie Simo.

It’s a cold, grey, windy day today and my yard is awash in activity. My birdĀ feeders especially are getting a workout with several new visitors this year, including a Mountain Chickadee. Mountain Chickadees aren’t uncommon along the Front Range, but they’re usually found in the foothills and mountains where there are an abundance of conifers rather than in my lower elevation deciduous-tree-dominated suburban neighborhood.

I was first alerted to my new guest by its scratchy “chicka-dee-dee” call, like a Black-capped Chickadee (a year-round resident in my neighborhood) with a sore throat. For comparison, here’s the Black-capped Chickadee’s call.

Black-capped Chickadee. Photo by Jamie Simo.

Other than their calls, Mountain Chickadees are fairly easy to differentiate from Black-capped Chickadees. The most obvious visual difference is the Mountain’s bold white eyebrow, which makes it a little angry-looking. The Mountain is also usually a lot greyer, with very little if any buffiness on the underparts and less white edging on the wings.

Although my area of Colorado is only home to Black-capped and Mountain Chickadees, the true ID challenge is between Black-capped and Carolina Chickadees. Carolina Chickadees are slightly smaller than Black-capped Chickadees and are more of a southeastern US bird. They were my backyard chickadee in Virginia.

Carolina Chickadee. Photo by Jamie Simo.

Like the Mountain Chickadee, Carolinas are greyer than the Black-capped with little white wing-edging and not as much buffy coloring on their underparts. Their white cheek patch is greyer toward the back of the head and their black “bib” is smaller than the Black-capped with well-defined edges. There is also much less white edging on the outer tail feathers in Carolina Chickadees.

Probably the easiest way to distinguish between the Carolina Chickadee and the Black-capped Chickadee, however, is by voice. The song of the Black-capped Chickadee is usually a 3-note “Hey sweet-ie” whereas the Carolina’s song is usually a a 4-note song: “Fee bee fee bay.” The Carolina Chickadee also tends to have a faster call. But don’t worry, the two look-alikes only share territory in a small band roughly shown on the map below.

Map showing zone of overlap (black line) between Black-capped and Carolina Chickadees. http://static.birds.cornell.edu/pfw_fr/AboutBirdsandFeeding/chickadeeIDtable.htm
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ID Challenge: Cattle Egret vs. Great Egret vs. Snowy Egret

Cattle Egret in breeding plumage. Photo by Jamie Simo.

Ah, the egret. One of the most majestic and graceful of birds. Fashionistas of the past agreed: thousands of egrets were slaughtered for their long, silky plumes, which used to adorn ladies’ hats.

There are 3 egret species that regularly visit Colorado: the Cattle Egret, the Great Egret, and the Snowy Egret. All 3 are only found in Colorado in the breeding season and are generally white birds. So how’s a birder supposed to know which one they’re looking at?

Size comparison between the Great Egret (left) and the Snowy Egret. Photo by Jamie Simo.

One way is to look at where the bird is. Is it wading in ankle-deep water in a marsh or is it poking around in a (perhaps wet) pasture or agricultural field? If it’s in a field, sometimes surrounded by cows, you’re almost certainly looking at a Cattle Egret. Cattle Egrets, which somehow became established in North America in the 1950’s, are shorter and stockier than our native egrets with either dark legs in non-breeding plumage or orange legs in breeding plumage, and thick, orange beaks. In breeding season, their plumes are a rusty color on their crowns, backs, and breasts that immediately give them away. Neither the Snowy nor the Great Egret have colorful

Snowy Egret in breeding plumage. Note the plumes on the chest. Photo by Jamie Simo.

plumes.

The next biggest egret in Colorado is the Snowy Egret. Next to the Cattle Egret, the Snowy is taller and more slender with a longer, more pointed bill. As mentioned, the Snowy Egret has white plumes so it’s more difficult to tell it apart from the Great Egret than the Cattle Egret.

The Great Egret is about twice the size of the Snowy Egret, towering over the smaller bird. It’s roughly the same size as a Great Blue Heron. It can be hard to judge size if you are only looking at a single bird, however. The Snowy Egret has black legs with yellow feet, while the Great Egret has both black legs and feet, but if the bird’s feet are submerged in water, that’s not a helpful characteristic either.

Great Egret. Photo by Jamie Simo.

The best way to distinguish between the two birds then, is by bill color. The Snowy Egret has a black bill with a yellow patch of skin on its face while the Great Egret has an orange bill with a yellow patch of skin on its face that turns a bright green in the breeding season.

So head to your nearest wetland or cow pasture and look for some egrets to test out your newfound ID skills. I guarantee you won’t be disappointed by these birds.